Cynthia Sass is a registered dietitian with master's degrees in both nutrition science and public health. Frequently seen on national TV, she's Health's contributing nutrition editor, and privately counsels clients in New York, Los Angeles, and long distance. Her latest New York Times best seller is S.A.S.S! Yourself Slim: Conquer Cravings, Drop Pounds and Lose Inches. Connect with Cynthia on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.
Plain and simple: We just don't feel full by liquid calories in quite the same way as we do real food. Drinking a juice or caramel coffee drink, for instance, won't make you feel full the way eating a bowl of veggie- and protein-packed stir-fry will. So monitor your intake of juice, soda, sweetened coffee and tea, and alcoholic beverages. If you consume each of those beverages during the day, you'll have taken in at least 800 extra calories by nighttime — and you'll still be hungry. (Incidentally, alcohol may suppress the metabolism of fat, making it tougher for you to burn those calories.) Some other ways to skip sugar? Check 'em out here.
How can you know if you are within your natural and healthy weight range? The body mass index (BMI) is a good way to see if you have a healthy weight. There are many BMI calculators available on the internet. Men and women between the ages of 20 and 65 can use the BMI. However, it doesn't apply to pregnant or breast-feeding women, very muscular people, or endurance athletes. With BMI, there is a wide range of weight that is considered healthy for a given height. That's because healthy bodies come in many shapes and sizes.
With these foods and this method, your ordinary meals become your best appetite suppressors! Protein, almonds and fiber keep you fuller for longer, and thus keeps hunger at bay (basically the same as suppressing the appetite). Grapefruit and green tea delivers a prolonged appetite suppression effect due to the combination of naringin and EGCG/caffeine. Every meal like this will make it much easier to stay away from food until the next meal time comes around.
Lots of people have, for their entire lives, used food as a reward. To restrict their own reward, and then not be allowed to have their reward after they succeed is tough. It’s like going into an apathetic void of brain fog and sadness. And sure, you can rewire your habits over time and eventually your body will self-regulate so hunger won’t be an issue anymore, but it takes time. This period is a trial by fire where many people fail.
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