Some antidepressant medications can cause weight gain, especially the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) such as Tryptizol, Saroten, and Clomipramine; as well as newer drugs such as Remeron (Mirtazapine). Lithium (for manic-depressive disorder) often causes weight gain. The most common antidepressants known as SSRI’s (for example Citalopram and Sertraline) usually don’t impact weight significantly. More on depression

Other diabetes medications. Insulin-releasing tablets (e.g. sulphonylureas) often lead to weight gain. These include: Minodiab, Euglucon, Daonil, and Glibenclamide. Tablets like Avandia, Actos, Starlix and NovoNorm also encourage weight gain. But not Metformin. The newer drugs Victoza and Byetta (injectable) often lead to weight loss, but possible long-term side effects are still unknown. More on diabetes
You’re more likely to eat more—and eat more high-fat, high-calorie foods—when you eat out than when you eat at home. Restaurants today serve such large portions that many have switched to larger plates and tables to accommodate them. You’ll gasp when you see just how bad the unhealthiest restaurant meals in America are. Don’t miss these 9 ways your kitchen setup can help you lose weight.
Most fad diets require people to make drastic changes in their diet such as severely limiting certain foods. For example, some diets suggest no sugar or carbohydrates, while others suggest very high protein intake. These types of diets cause rapid weight loss due to loss of body fluids, not body fat. Most fad diets are risky, and some are dangerous. One thing is for sure: they cannot be long-term.
Mansour, M. S., Ni, Y.-M., Roberts, A. L., Kelleman, M., RoyChoudhury, A., & St-Onge, M.-P. (2013, October 1). Ginger consumption enhances the thermic effect of food and promotes feelings of satiety without affecting metabolic and hormonal parameters in overweight men: A pilot study. Metabolism, 61(10), 1347–1352. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408800/
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