Based on blood samples and standardized questionnaires, the results showed that adding thylakoids to the subjects’ breakfasts suppressed hunger and increased secretion of cholecystokinin from three hours on. The thylakoids also prevented reactive hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar that results from insulin and blood sugar swings from high to low following a high-carb meal). “This study therefore suggests that the dietary addition of thylakoids could aid efforts to reduce food intake and prevent compensational eating later in the day, which may help to reduce body weight over time,” concluded the researchers.
^ Abenhaim, Lucien; Moride, Yola; Brenot, François; Rich, Stuart; Benichou, Jacques; Kurz, Xavier; Higenbottam, Tim; Oakley, Celia; Wouters, Emil; Aubier, Michel; Simonneau, Gérald; Bégaud, Bernard (1996). "Appetite-Suppressant Drugs and the Risk of Primary Pulmonary Hypertension". New England Journal of Medicine. 335 (9): 609–16. doi:10.1056/NEJM199608293350901. PMID 8692238.
Even if you do meet your goal, it's nearly impossible to keep off the weight over the long term: "The amount of restriction required [to maintain that number] will make you so hungry that you’ll eat everything in sight—it’s survival instinct," Dr. Seltzer says. And since calorie restriction gradually slows your metabolism, your body will be less prepared to burn the foods you binge on, he adds. That could mean gaining more pounds than you lost in the first place.
Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
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