Mason, A. E., Epel, E. S., Aschbacher, K., Lustig, R. H., Acree, M., Kristeller, J., … Daubenmier, J. (2016, May 1). Reduced reward-driven eating accounts for the impact of a mindfulness-based diet and exercise intervention on weight loss: Data from the SHINE randomized controlled trial. Appetite , 100, 86–93. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4799744/
So, what's all the fuss and concern? Obesity has health consequences. The complications resulting of obesity can have a considerable negative effect on the quality and length of a person's life. These complications can also have a significant impact on health care costs. People who are obese are at a higher risk of numerous illnesses, including heart attacks, strokes and diabetes. Obesity also increases the risk of:

An easy rule of thumb: "Shop the perimeter of the grocery store," says Carol, as she quickly learned that the center aisles often have foods loaded with preservatives and artificial ingredients. She used MyFitnessPal to log her meals, snacks, and exercise, and focused on a mix of protein, fresh vegetables, and healthy fats. That helped her drop weight quickly in the beginning—over six pounds a month—until it slowed to three or four because her body adjusted to her new routine. And while the center of the grocery store is filled with processed carbs, goodies and treats, Carol limits her intake of them. "I still eat sweets. I just make sure to keep them to small portions!" she says.
Most fad diets require people to make drastic changes in their diet such as severely limiting certain foods. For example, some diets suggest no sugar or carbohydrates, while others suggest very high protein intake. These types of diets cause rapid weight loss due to loss of body fluids, not body fat. Most fad diets are risky, and some are dangerous. One thing is for sure: they cannot be long-term.
It's a one-time investment you'll never regret. Here's why: Strength training builds lean muscle tissue, which burns more calories — at work or at rest — 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The more lean muscle you have, the faster you'll slim down. How do you start strength training? Try some push-ups or a few squats or lunges. Use your free weights to perform simple bicep curls or tricep pulls right in your home or office. Do these exercises three to four times per week, and you'll soon see a rapid improvement in your physique.
Most women will need to eat and drink fewer calories and get the right amount of healthy foods to lose weight. Increasing exercise or physical activity may help with weight loss, but choosing healthy foods (lean protein, whole grains, vegetables, and fruits) is what works best for many people to achieve a healthy weight.1 Combining healthy eating with increased physical activity is best. Talk to your doctor or nurse before starting any weight-loss program. He or she can work with you to find the best way for you to lose weight.

Eat good fats. It seems counterintuitive to eat fat when you’re trying lose fat, depriving your body of healthy fats will make it much harder to shed extra pounds. Include healthy fats like avocado, wild fish (salmon), coconut oil, grass fed butter (in moderation), nuts & seeds, which are essential to brain function, making hormones and supporting healthy cell membranes.
What is it about fiber that dulls your appetite? Because fiber is not able to be digested once consumed, plus it absorbs so much of its own weight in water, high-fiber foods help slow your body’s digestion of glucose (sugar), keep you feeling fuller for longer and beat cravings. Many foods high in fiber are also very nutritionally dense, meaning you get more bang for your nutritional buck and help prevent dehydration or deficiencies.
Very good article. Many of the people I work with have health issues related to type 2 diabetes so this article gives excellent direction for those struggling to manage their health condition with an appropriate diet that they can sustain. Counting calories is not necessarily the answer. Often times, people cannot understand why they just cannot lose weight or how they became diabetic or what to do about it. Thanks a lot.

Obviously, it’s still possible to lose weight on any diet – just eat fewer calories than you burn, right? The problem with this simplistic advice is that it ignores the elephant in the room: Hunger. Most people don’t like to “just eat less”, i.e. being hungry forever. That’s dieting for masochists. Sooner or later, a normal person will give up and eat, hence the prevalence of “yo-yo dieting”.
As funny as it sounds, sleep deprivation may make you fat — and not just because you're susceptible to cases of the late-night munchies (although there's that too). There's tons of research that demonstrates getting less than the desired amount — about 7 hours — of sleep per night can slow down your metabolism. Plus, when you're awake for longer, you're naturally more likely to nosh. So don't skimp on your ZZZs, and you'll be rewarded with an extra edge when it comes to shedding pounds quickly.
Dairy products contain varying amounts of lactose (milk sugar), which slows down weight loss. What’s more, part of the protein in milk generates a significant insulin response, which can have the same effect. Consequently, cutting back on dairy products may accelerate weight loss. This applies especially to dairy products typically lacking in fat, such as regular milk and various yogurts, but be careful with full-fat dairy such as cream and cheese all the same. And don’t forget whey protein powder, which is pure milk protein.
12. Talk positively to yourself and quiet your inner critic. Notice during the day your positive efforts and compliment yourself. "I chose a healthy vegetable plate instead of a slice of pizza. Great job!" The more you pat yourself on the back for what you're doing well, the more energy you'll have to keep doing it. If you notice you're telling yourself you'll never succeed, or beating yourself up for having two bowls of ice cream, stop! To quiet your inner critic head out for a brief walk, turn on some music and sway, and above all, tell yourself tomorrow is a new day and a new start.
Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
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