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Dairy products contain varying amounts of lactose (milk sugar), which slows down weight loss. What’s more, part of the protein in milk generates a significant insulin response, which can have the same effect. Consequently, cutting back on dairy products may accelerate weight loss. This applies especially to dairy products typically lacking in fat, such as regular milk and various yogurts, but be careful with full-fat dairy such as cream and cheese all the same. And don’t forget whey protein powder, which is pure milk protein.

One easy trick if you're a pasta fan is to swap out white pasta for the wonderfully named courgetti (spaghetti made from spiralizing courgette). You’ll hardly notice the difference when you’re eating it, but you’ll be fuller for longer despite consuming fewer calories. When you consume fewer calories, your body can go to your fat reserves for energy, rather than just burning off the food you’ve eaten.  
Most fad diets require people to make drastic changes in their diet such as severely limiting certain foods. For example, some diets suggest no sugar or carbohydrates, while others suggest very high protein intake. These types of diets cause rapid weight loss due to loss of body fluids, not body fat. Most fad diets are risky, and some are dangerous. One thing is for sure: they cannot be long-term.
Dietary fibers, whether from food sources or in concentrated supplement form, have been used for hundreds of years to promote fullness, improve gut health and digestive functions, and help maintain strong immunity and heart health. Despite the fact that fiber intake is inversely associated with hunger, body weight and body fat, studies show that the average fiber intake of adults in the United States is still less than half of recommended levels. (9)
Based on blood samples and standardized questionnaires, the results showed that adding thylakoids to the subjects’ breakfasts suppressed hunger and increased secretion of cholecystokinin from three hours on. The thylakoids also prevented reactive hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar that results from insulin and blood sugar swings from high to low following a high-carb meal). “This study therefore suggests that the dietary addition of thylakoids could aid efforts to reduce food intake and prevent compensational eating later in the day, which may help to reduce body weight over time,” concluded the researchers.

To get ready for her upcoming nuptials, Liz did the same thing every single day: She hit the bar…or rather, barre, attending a Pure Barre class every day with a few rest days sprinkled throughout (don't forget that rest is critical for long-term weight loss success). She was amazed at how quickly she felt stronger and leaner, feeling her body change in just 10 to 15 classes because of the small, isometric movements. And while she didn't focus on having a completely clean diet, Liz said that once she was in a routine, she "didn't crave the bad foods" she normally wanted, and naturally cut her sugar and refined carb intake without even noticing. We love when weight loss requires zero thought, don't you?
Anaerobic exercise, on the other hand, primarily uses sugar as its fuel. This doesn’t mean that it’s not good for weight loss, though. Anaerobic exercise helps build muscle, and as we explained above, this will help you burn calories even when you’re resting. Anaerobic exercises are generally high intensity, for example sprinting and weight lifting. 

These natural appetite suppressants, herbs, foods and compounds can help nip cravings by inducing thermogenesis, warming the body, balancing blood sugar levels, absorbing water in your digestive tract, reducing inflammation, improving your mood or energy, balancing hunger/fullness hormones like ghrelin and leptin, and altering release of certain digestive enzymes.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your healthcare provider or 911 immediately. Any mention of products or services is not meant as a guarantee, endorsement, or recommendation of the products, services, or companies. Reliance on any information provided is solely at your own risk. Please discuss any options with your healthcare provider.

When you go on a weight loss diet, usually the first thing sliced in half is the amount of food you eat. Not the case for Alicia, who went from downing three fast food meals a day—plus whatever else she craved, like ice cream—to eating five small healthy meals (key words: healthy, portion-controlled bites over fat-filled, drive-thru varieties). "The new foods keep me energized," she says of her My Fit Foods meal plan. As for exercise, Alicia fell in love with Zumba as soon as she saw her first class. "I walked in and had a blast dancing and moving my body in ways that I had never felt comfortable doing before," says Trimble. The lesson: Don't hate your workout routine—find something you love so you don't dread getting your sweat on.


Healthy living also involves keeping active. Keeping active helps to keep the body's metabolism (the rate at which your body uses food energy, i.e., burns calories) higher. For people who include muscle toning/building exercises in their exercise program, there are even greater benefits. Muscle has a higher metabolic rate (that is, it burns calories faster) than fat. So those who build some additional muscle will increase the rate they burn calories. Regular exercise will also help increase energy and confidence. Try to find a form of exercise you enjoy. Check with your doctor before starting an exercise program.
Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
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