After dinner, wash all the dishes, wipe down the counters, turn out the light, and, if necessary, tape closed the cabinets and refrigerator. Late-evening eating significantly increases the overall number of calories you eat, a University of Texas study found. Learning how to stop late-night snacking can save 300 or more calories a day, or 31 pounds a year.
Whenever I work with 1:1 clients, I have them fill in some paperwork in advance of our first session. The first questionnaire has a section asking them to say what foods they “typically” have for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks. The second has a specific food journal they complete for four days showing everything they ate. What happens almost all of the time is what people think they “typically” eat is MUCH better than what’s actually in the journal. Our brains have this miraculous way of forgetting the bad stuff. 

At any given time, there are dozens of weight-loss hypes in the marketplace that claim to take off 10 pounds in 10 days, or whatever. Desperation can tempt us to try anything — from "clean eating" to cutting out food groups entirely. Keep in mind: Just because an avocado-walnut-"crunchy"-kale-salad dripping in coconut oil is deemed "clean" by a so-called "expert" on your Instagram feed does not make it an unlimited food. Moral of the story? Avoid fads, eat real food, watch some Netflix, and unwind (perhaps with a glass of wine in hand). Now that's my kind of detox.
Another weight loss aid that is available in the UK is orlistat, a medication that works by reducing the amount of fat absorbed by your body from the food you eat. It is a prescription only medication and a GP or online doctor need to assess whether it’s suitable for you. Orlistat does not affect your appetite and you need to eat a low fat diet while taking it.
Why this easy fitness plan works: It's common for people who exercise regularly to do the same routine week after week. If you do the same exercises at the same intensity all the time you'll get the same results. Your body hits a plateau. This plan increases your activity level without added stress or strain to your joints. So you burn more calories without taxing your body.

Nuts. It’s very easy to eat until the nuts are gone, regardless of how full you are. A tip: According to science, salted nuts are harder to stop eating than unsalted nuts. Salted nuts tempt you to more overeating. Good to know. Another tip: Avoid bringing the entire bag to the couch, preferably choose a small bowl instead. I often eat all the nuts in front of me, whether I’m hungry or not.
Even if you do meet your goal, it's nearly impossible to keep off the weight over the long term: "The amount of restriction required [to maintain that number] will make you so hungry that you’ll eat everything in sight—it’s survival instinct," Dr. Seltzer says. And since calorie restriction gradually slows your metabolism, your body will be less prepared to burn the foods you binge on, he adds. That could mean gaining more pounds than you lost in the first place.
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Larson-Meyer, D. E., Willis, K. S., Willis, L. M., Austin, K. J., Hart, A. M., Breton, A. B., & Alexander, B. M. (2013, June 8). Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and postmeal thermogenesis [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(5), 482–493. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719885
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