Before a workout, turbocharge the fat-blasting effects by sipping a cup of green tea. In a recent 12-week study, participants who combined a daily habit of 4-5 cups of green tea each day with a 25-minute sweat session lost an average of two more pounds than the non tea-drinking exercisers. Thank the compounds in green tea called catechins, belly-fat crusaders that blast adipose tissue by triggering the release of fat from fat cells (particularly in the belly), and then speeding up the liver’s capacity for turning that fat into energy.

This South American tea comes from the yerba mate plant. Its leaves and twigs are dried, usually over a fire, and steeped in hot water to make an herbal tea. This caffeine-containing tea, often called mate, may help promote weight loss. Some consider it an ideal substitute for coffee, minus the bitterness. The Mayo Clinic advises, however, to enjoy this tea in moderation. Some studies have found that people who drink large amounts of mate over prolonged periods may be at increased risk for certain types of cancer such as cancer of the mouth, lungs and esophagus (smoking in combination with drinking mate increases the cancer risk).
One concern with fasting that still seems undecided is the effect it has on those with diabetes or similar diseases. Typically, those who are diabetic eat meals every few hours to maintain blood sugar levels, making intermittent fasting next to impossible. While evidence surrounding diabetes and fasting is still growing, one recent study actually showed intermittent fasting helped those with Type II diabetes lose weight and improve fasting glucose[*].
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
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