Born from leaves and twigs of the yerba mate plant, this South American weight-loss tea is rife with stimulating chemicals like caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. In a study in animals that ate a high-fat diet, those that consumed yerba mate had lower blood sugar levels and didn’t gain as much weight as those that didn’t consume the drink. Plus, obese people taking an yerba mate supplement for 12 weeks lost more fat compared to a placebo group, in a 2015 study in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Yerba mate is considered a substitute for coffee—without the bitterness—so try it in place of your morning Joe tomorrow. (Consider these fat-releasing habits to help you slim down.)
That doesn’t mean you should take up a coffee habit if you don’t already have one. “It’s a mild stimulant and too much can cause jitters and heart palpitations,” Cording points out. “You want to hit that sweet spot but don’t want to overdo it.” She recommends having less than 400 milligrams of caffeine a day (which translates to about four eight-ounce cups of coffee) to see results.

Then began a long period of struggle. My weight bounced up alarmingly in September 2011. It was alarming in part because I was continuing with the same exercise and careful eating that had been working so well. One thing I think I have learned about weight loss is that the same regimen that works for losing weight when you’re heavy won’t work as well (or perhaps at all) when you’re considerably lighter. That seems to be in part just because you naturally need fewer calories just to maintain your weight when you weigh less. But that would only explain why my weight didn’t continue to go down; it couldn’t explain how, keeping the same regimen going, my weight would suddenly bounce back up so alarmingly. I suppose that could just be chalked up to my seasonal pattern of gaining weight in the Fall/Winter, but to me, because the bounce was so unusually sharp, this also seems to be going on: Sometimes, I think, when you lose weight, your (or at least my) body freaks out, thinking that it’s starving, and starts to “try,” as it were, to gain weight back, with some of its efforts not going to try to make you eat more (which efforts one can resist), but to slow down your metabolism. Or something. I didn’t and don’t really understand what was happening there, but what had been working was for some reason clearly no longer working. [So, there appears to be some research suggesting that metabolic changes are caused by weight loss that make it hard to keep the weight off. Some of this research is reported on in this New York Times piece by Tara Parker-Pope. See esp. the 6 paragraphs that begin with the sentence “Leibel and his colleague Michael Rosenbaum have pioneered much of what we know about the body’s response to weight loss.” I didn’t see there any suggestion of the kind of almost violent “freak-out” I’m conveniently positing here, though.]
Bloating is directly attributed to water retention, which is something that cucumbers are known to prevent. Water rushes out of the system when cucumbers are consumed consistently. They are especially good for handling weight gain due to a menstrual cycle. Cholesterol is combated by oranges, which also assist the immune systems functions. The other citrus fruits in this blend emphasize a deep intestinal cleansing. Meanwhile, the mint fosters fast nutrient absorption and energy conversion. In general, it also quickens and eases digestion, especially for those who have ulcers or hernias. This recipe focuses on functionality over flavor, but it still has a decent taste.

Juice fasting involves consumption of juices of fruits and vegetables during the fasting period. No solid foods are eaten during this period which can last for a day to 2 weeks. This type of fasting requires careful planning. One needs to get enough minerals and vitamins from a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables. This fast is meant for detoxification and weight loss.


In a small skillet heat the remaining ½ teaspoon olive oil on medium low. Whisk the egg whites and eggs together with a tablespoon of water until light and airy and add to the small skillet. Let cook slowly undisturbed until ½ of the eggs have set. Use a spatula to gently lift one side of the omelet so that the runny eggs can pool below, then lay back down the cooked eggs and top the entire top of the omelet with cheese.
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