I eat my first meal around noon or later on most days. However, it’s nice to take a break from fasting from time to time – on weekends, when you’re especially stressed, or if you’re feeling a little run down are all good examples of when you might want to eat more regularly. And be careful of under-eating for days or weeks on end – it’s still important to make sure you get enough energy (primarily fat) from your food to help your body feel and perform at its best.
Rooibos tea is made from the leaves of the “red bush” plant, grown exclusively in the small Cederberg region of South Africa, near Cape Town. What makes rooibos tea particularly good for your belly is a unique and powerful flavanoid called Aspalathin. Research shows this compound can reduce stress hormones that trigger hunger and fat storage and are linked to hypertension, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Yup, sometimes the kettle can be as effective as the kettlebell.
The bulk of the food items on the list consists of green leafy vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats. The trick is to follow it to the T. So if you find yourself wondering whether you can eat something that’s not on the list, the answer is no, you can’t. It’s a simple rule that’s not easy to follow, but bear with it for just a week (and perhaps review my clients’ results – they all stuck to it).
Sip and soothe the central nervous system with this tea. The hop, a component in beer, is a sedative plant whose pharmacological activity is due primarily to the bitter resins in its leaves. Hops increase the activity of the neurotransmitter GABA, which helps combat anxiety. New research suggests simple food choices can make the difference between feeling anxious and feeling calm and in control — and that’s a big deal. Eighteen percent of the population suffers some form of anxiety disorder, and experts say everyday worry can quickly snowball into a crippling condition if it’s not dealt with swiftly. And it all begins in the kitchen. Anxious? Avoid these Foods That Make Anxiety Worse.
While H20 is the best bet for your body during workouts, a cup of black coffee should be your go-to pre-workout beverage. During a 1-hour time trial, cyclists who took a caffeine supplement were able to ride about a mile farther than those who took a placebo, a 2008 study published in the International Journal of Sports Physiology & Performance found. What’s more, other scientific research has linked caffeine consumption with increased endurance and reaction times. The longer and harder you can work out, the more calories and fat you’re apt to burn. The problem is, most caffeine-enhanced energy drinks are loaded with added sugars (what’s the point of an exercise-boosting drink that makes you fat?). A much more waistline-friendly way to reap the benefits of caffeine: black coffee. It’s sugar-free, packed with antioxidants and free of calories.
Intermittent fasting diet can certainly be helpful in weight loss, as is proven by certain research studies. A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition, concluded that the 5:2 method of intermittent fasting was more effective for weight loss, than a regular long term low calorie diet. In the 5:2 method of intermittent fasting, dieters eat normally for five days a week, but restrict their calorie intake and bring it down dramatically for the rest of the two days. The study also concluded that people who followed intermittent fasting also had a drop in systolic blood pressure and their bodies were able to metabolise fat more rapidly, after each meal. The fasting method seems to be an effective one for weight loss, provided that it is followed in a planned manner and after due consultation with a certified nutritionist or dietitian. Moreover, people with diabetes or any other metabolic disease which necessitates eating food after every few hours, can obviously not follow intermittent fasting for weight loss.
Suprisingly, though, fasting may be a good idea. A recent review by Stephen Anton and colleagues, in the journal Obesity, found that intermittent fasting may come with a variety of health benefits, including reducing inflammation, improving the ratio of lean tissue to fat, improving cognitive function, preventing type 2 diabetes, and possibly even prolonging life span.
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
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