If you like the taste of apple cider vinegar, then by all means, drink up! But if you are a normal human being who prefers not to chug pure acid, then you should know there's zero evidence that drinking the nasty stuff can actually help you drop pounds (or impart the laundry list of health benefits the Internet seems to associate with it, for that matter).
First and foremost, I spoke with my doctor, the registered dietitian I was seeing, and even my gynecologist about how I wanted to try ADF to make sure this was safe for me. They knew I had been doing 16:8 IF for over a year, and I explained that now that I was in my 40s, I was having a hard time losing belly fat and was concerned because it's the unsafe kind of visceral fat that can lead to cancer (which is in my family).
With this new-found popularity, the number and type of cleanse diets has soared, from food-based "liver detoxes" to liquid-only fasts for several weeks and everything in between. While the extreme cleanses often get a bad rap—Beyonce confessed that drinking the maple syrup-lemon-cayenne pepper concoction made her "cranky"—many women swear by cleanse diets to lose weight, increase energy, and even help clear up acne.
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