Alternate day fasting (ADF), a form of intermittent fasting, involves fasting one day, eating the next, and repeating. If you need to, you are allowed to eat on fasting days, the recommended amount being 25 percent of your total calories. For example, if you've calculated that 1,800 calories a day is the amount you need to eat in order to lose weight, on a fasting day, you'd eat no more than 450 calories. On nonfasting days, you'd eat 1,800 calories.
I could tell just from paging through the weekly calendar that my weight, though bouncing around, had been mostly moving upward through to the end of March 2010, but then had turned downward in early April for my annual summer weight loss. But seeing the dots on the graph that was produced (which at that time was just those blue dots moving upwards for a few months, followed by just the first month or so of downward moving dots) gave me a much better idea of what the pattern was. Though my weight was, as always, bouncing around, there was a quite definite shape to what was happening: though the lines had some width to them, reflecting the bouncing around that was going on, there were pretty clear straight lines, first angling up and then down, emerging on the graph.
In other words? “Drinking makes you more likely to eat sh*t,” Dr. Seltzer says, referring to drunk foods. At the same time, he stops short of asking patients to quit alcohol cold-turkey to lose weight. Plus, research suggests you don’t have to, as long as your intake is moderate—i.e., less than about a drink a day. “If you drink a glass of wine every night and notice you eat more afterward, eat less early to account for this,” he says. “Or, if you’re drinking four glasses of wine a week, drink three instead so you’ll won’t feel such a big difference.”
With this new-found popularity, the number and type of cleanse diets has soared, from food-based "liver detoxes" to liquid-only fasts for several weeks and everything in between. While the extreme cleanses often get a bad rap—Beyonce confessed that drinking the maple syrup-lemon-cayenne pepper concoction made her "cranky"—many women swear by cleanse diets to lose weight, increase energy, and even help clear up acne.
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