For a detox diet to truly work, you need to maintain these three key organs by nourishing your body with the right nutrients. Dr. Oz’s 48-Hour Weekend Cleanse is based upon eating certain “detoxifying” foods that will keep these systems running smoothly. The plan couldn’t be simpler to follow so you’re not always focused on what to eat next. You'll need to prepare and eat the following meals and snacks two days in a row. To get ready for the weekend cleanse, print out the complete cleanse shopping list and make a trip to the supermarket. Get the shopping list here.
These weight-loss tea leaves are partially oxidized (black teas, for instance, are fully oxidized), lending a smooth, but bold taste to the brew. Happily, they also help boost your body’s ability to metabolize fats, reports a 2009 study from Chinese researchers. When obese and overweight participants consumed oolong for six weeks about two-thirds lost more than 2.2 pounds and 12 percent belly fat. Bonus: They ended the study with healthier cholesterol and triglyceride scores, all adding up to a stronger ticker. (Here are 23 tricks to flatten your belly without exercise.)
It’s likely the weight-loss tea that you’re most familiar with—and one that’s been shown to be protective against diabetes. When scientists look at black tea extract in animal studies, they find that black tea can help prevent weight gain when eating a high-fat diet, possibly because it blocks fat absorption during digestion. Of course, the research is preliminary, but black tea contains plant compounds called polyphenols—namely theaflavins and thearubigans—that may be responsible for the fat-blocking benefits. (Here’s more proof that black tea is jam-packed full of health benefits from a new study.)
Somehow over time, the idea that people should eat many small meals throughout the day to “boost” their metabolism became mainstream, a direct result of snack-food companies’ advertising, he notes. Snack makers also had a strategy to legitimize their claims. “The insidious part is the food industry sponsors a lot of dietician food conferences, and they were able to teach dieticians you should eat six times a day to lose weight,” says Fung.
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
×