This recent study was conducted over a 50-week period, making it one of the longest intermittent fasting studies to date. Researchers split 150 participants into three groups. One group followed the 5:2 intermittent fasting diet (with two non-consecutive “fast” days per week eating about 500 kcal), while the second group reduced daily calorie intake by approximately 20%. A third control group weren’t instructed to change their diet.
Detox teas are great for flushing out toxins from your body. Toxins like harmful chemicals and free oxygen radicals lead to increased stress levels in the body. Stress slows down metabolism, weakens immunity, and increases the level of inflammation. And you start to gain weight, find it difficult to lose weight, suffer from constipation, gastritis, liver problems, and disturbed sleep, and feel tired all the time. The antioxidants and other phytonutrients in detox teas deactivate the harmful effects of toxins, cleanse the digestive tract, and relax your brain – promoting weight loss and better health. So, let’s get to know the top 10 detox teas that you can buy and start shedding the extra flab. Scroll down.
While H20 is the best bet for your body during workouts, a cup of black coffee should be your go-to pre-workout beverage. During a 1-hour time trial, cyclists who took a caffeine supplement were able to ride about a mile farther than those who took a placebo, a 2008 study published in the International Journal of Sports Physiology & Performance found. What’s more, other scientific research has linked caffeine consumption with increased endurance and reaction times. The longer and harder you can work out, the more calories and fat you’re apt to burn. The problem is, most caffeine-enhanced energy drinks are loaded with added sugars (what’s the point of an exercise-boosting drink that makes you fat?). A much more waistline-friendly way to reap the benefits of caffeine: black coffee. It’s sugar-free, packed with antioxidants and free of calories.
Feasting eight hours and then fasting the following 16 hours? Or is it even better to fast two whole days a week and then enjoy eating without regrets for the rest of the week? Intermittent fasting, also known as 16:8 diet or 5:2 diet, is trendy. Numerous popular self-help books on this topic promise weight loss without yo-yo effect, as well as sustained changes in metabolism and resulting health benefits. The German Nutrition Society (DGE), on the other hand, warns that intermittent fasting is not suitable for long-term weight regulation. In addition, according to DGE, there is not enough scientific evidence on the long-term effects of this dieting method.
Physiologically, calorie restriction has been shown in animals to increase lifespan and improve tolerance to various metabolic stresses in the body. [4] Although the evidence for caloric restriction in animal studies is strong, there is less convincing evidence in human studies. Proponents of the diet believe that the stress of intermittent fasting causes an immune response that repairs cells and produces positive metabolic changes (reduction in triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, blood pressure, weight, fat mass, blood glucose). [3,5] An understandable concern of this diet is that followers will overeat on non-fasting days to compensate for calories lost during fasting. However, studies have not shown this to be true when compared with other weight loss methods. [5]
The morning java boost is a necessity for many of us, but there’s proof that the jolt may spur a better workout (translation: burn more calories). A 2015 study in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness found that participants could do almost 20% more leg presses and 12% more bench presses when they drank 2–3 cups of coffee before their workout. A similar 2011 study found an (albeit small) increase in energy expenditure both before and after exercise in the group that drank coffee before exercise.

Another program called the 5:2 Fast Diet involves eating 5 days a week and fasting for the other 2 days, when women can get no more than 500 calories and men no more than 600. That’s a quarter of the amount you likely eat on the days when you don’t fast. Whether you eat those calories in one sitting or spread them across micro-meals throughout the day is up to you.

To prep his patients for success, Dr. Seltzer tells them to plan around a large evening meal by eating a lighter breakfast and lunch—NBD since most people who eat a meal before bed tend to wake up feeling relatively full, he says. Research suggests balanced bedtime meals may also promote steady next-day blood sugar levels, which also helps with appetite regulation.
“Mid-morning, I used to have a Danish or a donut,” sighs the famed L.A. psychologist. “Then in the afternoon, I’d have a muffin with coffee. Plus, burgers for lunch, huge bowls of pasta for dinner. It was stress related eating. I knew I wasn’t choosing the right foods, but I couldn’t seem to help myself.” For awhile, she tried to ignore the weight steadily creeping onto her petite 5’3” frame. Then came the morning when her favorite jeans wouldn’t button any more. She realized something had to give. “It was either forget shopping or lose weight,” she recalls, “ I decided to give weight loss a try.”
The 3-Day Detox Diet. Don't have 2-weeks for a full detox? This 3-day detox is my own plan. It's easy, it's simple and there are no fancy foods required. In fact, it follows guidelines developed by the USDA's MyPlate nutritional program. This is the plan that I use when I need to reset my taste buds after a busy party season or a vacation full of indulgent foods.
×