Today, most commercial detox diets tout an unhealthy formula of minimal calories and nutrients along with some key—usually foul-tasting—ingredient that has supposed fat-melting power, like cayenne pepper or vinegar. But no science backs the idea that following a specific diet for a week or eating only one food will get rid of "toxins." Your body has the power to do that all on its own: That's why you have a liver, kidneys, and a digestive system.
If you want a drink that mimics the fancy beverages served in health spas, try this homemade detox water. This is one of the best-rounded brews ever devised by human minds. The lemon leads to a cleaned out digestive system, and cucumbers keep your figure slim by eliminating unnecessary water storage. Strawberries combine with the other fruits to provide the most prominent edge of sweetness, which is accompanied by the brisk coolness of mint. This digestive aid merges efforts with the basil to create a stable stomach for any lass. Get ready to feel like you just ordered room service!

Drinking a combination of carbohydrates and protein after a hard workout can help restore your energy and aid in building lean, metabolism-boosting muscle, but it turns out that you don’t need a fancy recovery beverage to reap these benefits. After participating in a vigorous cycling session, cyclists who drank chocolate milk were able to ride 51 percent longer in a subsequent workout than those who drank a standard recovery beverage, a 2009 article in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism found. Plus, chocolate milk is cheaper (and tastier) than anything you’ll find in a sports nutrition store.


Each tea has its own special benefit, but just the act of drinking tea can be good for you, too: when you’re on a diet, you want to ensure that you definitely get those eight cups of water per day. Caffeine-free teas —or more properly teasans (infusions made from plants other than camellia sinensis), can create a feeling of fullness and help you keep your diet on track. Don’t make your healthy drink harmful, though. "To further promote weight loss, try to avoid using heavy creamers or whole milk and refined sugars," Dr. Verma explains. What to know what teas are best for weight loss? Read on to find out.


In preparation to write this article, I decided to try fasting for myself.  I encountered countless research, articles, and podcasts proclaiming the health benefits of fasting.  Not only for fat loss, but for it’s anti-aging, anti-cancer, and mentally stimulating effects. Additionally, if I am recommending something to my patients, I like to have first-hand experience with it in order to better guide them.
Let's make one thing clear: Restrictive diets suck. Which is why instead of driving yourself crazy trying to stick to one, you can consider sipping a weight loss tea. Some brews can help you stop snacking while others can boost calorie burn. And while we realize that may sound like an opening line for a cheesy weight loss pill advertisement, you can't argue with science. We've scoured the research journals to bring you the best fat-frying brews on store shelves that might be worth a sip. 
This detoxifying drink is the epitome of weight loss. Bloating is instantaneously reverted by lemons and limes. Ginger similarly calms the belly down to easy digestive passageways. Oranges deliver antioxidants to cleanse every nook and cranny. Cucumbers instill the proper retention of moisture, and they load the system with vitamins A and B. No toxins can withstand the presence of this drink. The compounds take time to focus on the inside and outside. This recipe tastes like nothing else on the planet, and it will make you stand out too! Now you can proudly proclaim, Size 0, here I come!
First, the concern has been raised that if one does not eat food for an entire day, for example, then the basal metabolic rate of the individual will decrease. However, research has shown this not to be the case. A study compared alternate day fasting (eating every other day) to daily caloric restriction (400 calories less than usual). After 8 weeks, the metabolic rate in the caloric restriction group fell 6%, while it only fell 1% in the alternate day fasting group, although the same amount of weight was lost. After 24 week follow up, the caloric restriction group still had a lower metabolic rate by 4.5%, while the alternate day fasting group had maintained their normal metabolic rate (1).
Whether a regimen calls for two fasting days a week or eating your meals in a smaller "window" of time in the day, all plans share a near-freedom from calorie counting, a big plus for weary food diarists. Once you have planned your fasting-period menu—say, a 500-calorie day of chicken and veggies—you're set. And in your nonfasting periods, you eat normal, healthy meals (even that steak!) without worrying about every bite.
But the psychological or spiritual effect can't be discounted, says Dillard. "People love the idea of cleansing, of purification rituals, going to the Ganges, to the spa. It has powerful psychological, religious, spiritual meaning. That has its own positive effect on health. But we need to separate that from saying this is science or good medicine."

Jeni S., a 31-year-old mom of two and group fitness instructor, first discovered cleanse diets after talking with a fellow fitness instructors. "I was complaining to her about my post-holiday bloat and she recommended I try a cleanse to 'flush' it all out and sort of reset everything." On her friend's recommendation, Jeni started with the Shakeology Jumpstart Cleanse—"a nutrient rich, calorie restrictive cleanse designed to help rid your body of undigested food and other toxins." She adds, "The goal is to get as many nutrients with as few calories as possible."
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