Whether you’re addicted to your local juice bar or pick up a bottle or two at the grocery store, you should know that even the most natural juices are loaded with sugar. A glass of 100 percent grape juice has nine teaspoons of sugar, a glass of 100 percent orange juice has six teaspoons, and a glass of 100 percent apple juice has seven teaspoons. (Actually, sugar can crop up in a lot of unexpected places. Check out the 10 kid’s meals that have more sugar than a can of Pepsi.)
They serve a variety of functions that range from physiological to psychological. Mentally, these brews are awesome alternatives for snacks and meals. They fulfill the pleasurable reward principles without incurring any physical sacrifices. Similarly, anything that causes weight gain can be counteracted by adhering to the ritualistic consumption of detoxification water.
Made from pulverized green tea leaves, you stir matcha into hot water. Therefore, you consume the whole tea leaf. For that reason, you get a bigger dose of ECGC. One study from the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs compared the two and found that drinking matcha delivered 137 times the metabolism-revving ECGC compared to traditional green tea. One tip: if you find matcha to be too bitter on its own, foam it into milk and stir with honey for a delicious matcha latte. (If you need some more convincing, here’s some more information on how incredible matcha is as a weight-loss tea.)

Total Tea Gentle Detox tastes great and is fast acting. Initially, you may have to go to the washroom frequently as the tea first cleanses the colon. After 2-3 days, bloating and any discomfort will disappear. You will also start to notice an improvement in your energy levels and productivity. And soon after, you will see visible changes in your appearance, get a flat tummy, and be highly motivated to eat and live healthily.
I was going to the gym, mostly to play basketball with my son, or, if he wasn’t with me, just to “shoot around.” My wife would also go, and used her time wisely, mainly using one of the elliptical machines. I would come up from the basketball court to the weight/exercise machine room and lift weights while I waited for her to finish. At some point, I started joining her on a nearby elliptical machine, first for just about 10 minutes or so, and then slowly increasing until I was doing about 36 minutes (which was about how long it took me to do 4 miles on the settings I was using). Being one to keep track of such things, I started bringing a pocket calendar, and recording what I did. The elliptical machine wanted to know my weight, so it could calculate the calories I burned, so I would step on the scale they had there, and enter my weight, and then I recorded my weight along with my settings, time, distance, and calories, on my calendar. In that way, I stumbled onto the important practice of keeping fairly regular track of my weight.
That's not to say every cleanse is bad. Done in a healthy (read: sane) way, detoxing "can feel like an intervention, a fresh beginning," Hellerstein says. "Most people eat way more food than necessary, which taxes the liver and kidneys," says Ronald Stram, M.D., director of the Center for Integrative Health and Healing in New York. Not only does a healthy detox give your digestive system a break, but by eliminating added sugar, saturated fats, and alcohol, it also rids your diet of things that can exacerbate health issues, Ventrelle says. "Plus," she notes, "you'll likely cut calories in the process."
Before a workout, turbocharge the fat-blasting effects by sipping a cup of green tea. In a recent 12-week study, participants who combined a daily habit of 4-5 cups of green tea each day with a 25-minute sweat session lost an average of two more pounds than the non tea-drinking exercisers. Thank the compounds in green tea called catechins, belly-fat crusaders that blast adipose tissue by triggering the release of fat from fat cells (particularly in the belly), and then speeding up the liver’s capacity for turning that fat into energy.
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
×