There's lots of hype around tea's benefits—especially when it comes to drinking tea and weight loss. Next to water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world, and for good reason. Tea is a versatile beverage that can be served hot or cold. Tea also comes in a variety of flavors and it can help quench thirst, wake you up or help you relax. While there are many varieties sold at the store, true teas include green, oolong, black and white. Each true tea is derived from the Camellia sinensis plant, but the tea leaves are processed differently, which accounts for different colors, flavors and health benefits. But can drinking tea actually help you lose weight?
Tea, specifically green tea, has been touted for its ability to boost metabolism. While tea does contain caffeine and catechins (natural antioxidants said to increase energy expenditure and burn fat), research shows mixed results regarding the use of tea for weight loss and weight maintenance. A 2009 meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Obesity linked catechins in tea to a modest—about three pounds over 12 weeks—weight loss. However, a more recent review study found drinking green tea was not associated with significant weight loss. And, since many studies used concentrations of catechins much greater than what you would get from drinking green tea, further research is needed to support claims of tea aiding in weight loss through increased metabolism. The upside? Drinking unsweetened tea does help keep you hydrated, which can assist with weight loss by preventing overeating caused by mistaking thirst for hunger.

Oi Ocha means “Tea, please!” in Japanese. And to that we say, “Yes! Thank you!”A bottle of this calorie-free, sugar-free green tea provides slightly less caffeine than a tall cup of coffee and some impressive detox benefits, especially when consumed pre-workout. In a recent study, participants who combined a daily habit of 4-5 cups of green tea each day with a 25-minute sweat session lost two more pounds than the non tea-drinking exercisers. What makes green tea so waist friendly are compounds called catechins, belly-fat crusaders that blast adipose tissue by revving the metabolism, increasing the release of fat from fat cells (particularly in the belly), and then speeding up the liver’s fat burning capacity.


Rooibos tea is made from the leaves of the “red bush” plant, grown exclusively in the small Cederberg region of South Africa, near Cape Town. What makes rooibos tea particularly good for your belly is a unique and powerful flavonoid called Aspalathin. According to South African researchers, polyphenols and flavonoids found in the plant inhibits adipogenesis–the formation of new fat cells–by as much as 22 percent. The chemicals also help aid fat metabolism. Plus, Rooibos is naturally sweet, so you won’t need to add sugar. It’s also not technically a tea—it’s an herbal infusion. Want to give your metabolism a kick? Check out these 6 Ways to Boost your Metabolism.

A daring dieting infusion comes to life with this benevolent blueberry detox drink. The masterful concoction features a delicious core of mandarin oranges. The wedges permeate moisture with ample healing properties, and the slight sourness is decadently delightful. At the same time, a stash of ripened blueberries brings extra antioxidants. These superfoods are notoriously packed with vitamin C and fiber. Each berry gains its navy coloration through the presence of detoxifying pigments. These compounds are known as anthocyanins, and their inclusion in a health regimen can prevent the presence of free radicals and ulcers. To intensify taste, simply squish berries and twist oranges.
And Ian K. Smith, M.D. agrees. Dr. Ian is a Harvard graduate, founder of the SHRED Lifestyle, and the author several best-selling diet books. He explains that the liver, kidney, lungs, skin, and gastrointestinal system remove toxins that accumulate in the body. But following a detox diet full of natural foods can enhance the body's ability to cleanse. He adds, however, that dieters should make no assumptions about health when choosing a detox diet. "Detoxes have gotten very trendy, and many of them are unhealthy and quite dangerous."
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