Questions still remain about intermittent fasting, specifically whether all methods (such as the warrior diet, where you only eat one large meal in the evening) are similarly effective. Another form of intermittent fasting, known as time-restricted feeding (where people can only eat during a fixed four, six, or eight-hour eating window) is also receiving considerable attention, with one study suggesting the time of the day you eat might be as important as what you eat. Research is underway to determine the best time to eat, how long you should fast, and how these diets specifically affect health
Before a workout, turbocharge the fat-blasting effects by sipping a cup of green tea. In a recent 12-week study, participants who combined a daily habit of 4-5 cups of green tea each day with a 25-minute sweat session lost an average of two more pounds than the non tea-drinking exercisers. Thank the compounds in green tea called catechins, flat belly crusaders that blast adipose tissue by triggering the release of fat from fat cells (particularly in the belly), and then speeding up the liver’s capacity for turning that fat into energy.
Intermittent fasting leads to weight loss and promotes health. However, it is not superior to conventional calorie restriction diets, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Heidelberg University Hospital report in a study called HELENA—the largest investigation on intermittent fasting to date. The scientists conclude that there are many paths leading to a healthier weight. They recommend that individuals find a diet plan that fits them best.

Even if you do meet your goal, it's nearly impossible to keep off the weight over the long term: "The amount of restriction required [to maintain that number] will make you so hungry that you’ll eat everything in sight—it’s survival instinct," Dr. Seltzer says. And since calorie restriction gradually slows your metabolism, your body will be less prepared to burn the foods you binge on, he adds. That could mean gaining more pounds than you lost in the first place.
And Ian K. Smith, M.D. agrees. Dr. Ian is a Harvard graduate, founder of the SHRED Lifestyle, and the author several best-selling diet books. He explains that the liver, kidney, lungs, skin, and gastrointestinal system remove toxins that accumulate in the body. But following a detox diet full of natural foods can enhance the body's ability to cleanse. He adds, however, that dieters should make no assumptions about health when choosing a detox diet. "Detoxes have gotten very trendy, and many of them are unhealthy and quite dangerous."
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