First, the concern has been raised that if one does not eat food for an entire day, for example, then the basal metabolic rate of the individual will decrease. However, research has shown this not to be the case. A study compared alternate day fasting (eating every other day) to daily caloric restriction (400 calories less than usual). After 8 weeks, the metabolic rate in the caloric restriction group fell 6%, while it only fell 1% in the alternate day fasting group, although the same amount of weight was lost. After 24 week follow up, the caloric restriction group still had a lower metabolic rate by 4.5%, while the alternate day fasting group had maintained their normal metabolic rate (1).
Obviously, if you’re trying to lose weight, you’re better off getting your calories from actual food rather than drinks. They’ll help you feel full longer, she says. But you’re also a human and drinking water 24/7 isn’t super thrilling at 4 p.m. From your first cup of coffee in the morning to that afternoon iced tea, here is a list of the drinks you should avoid—or at least drink in moderation.
Because water is an appetite suppressant, drinking it before meals can make you feel fuller, therefore reducing the amount of food you eat. Health resource website WebMD states that drinking water before meals results in an average reduction in intake of 75 calories per meal. Drinking water before just one meal per day would cause you to ingest 27,000 fewer calories per year. Do the math: You'd lose about eight pounds per year just from drinking water! Now imagine if you drank it before each meal. Our Gaiam Stainless Steel Water Bottle is a great way to make sure you are getting the right amount of water before a meal.
Any intermittent fasting approach will work if you can tolerate the hunger pains and stick to it. Sounds easy, but it is a very hard thing to do and for many it is not realistic. When you are fasting, your body thinks there is a famine and will try to get you to eat. The idea is that by including non-fasting periods, when you eat what you want, you may feel less like you are on a “diet”, and that makes it easier to stick to.
Alcohol is particularly bad for your weight because it’s a toxin. Your body mobilizes to burn off the calories in alcohol as quickly as possible—ignoring any other calories that might have come along with it. So whether it’s wine and cheese or beer and wings, the body metabolizes the drink while shoving more of the accompanying food calories into fat cells.
Born from leaves and twigs of the yerba mate plant, this South American weight-loss tea is rife with stimulating chemicals like caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. In a study in animals that ate a high-fat diet, those that consumed yerba mate had lower blood sugar levels and didn’t gain as much weight as those that didn’t consume the drink. Plus, obese people taking an yerba mate supplement for 12 weeks lost more fat compared to a placebo group, in a 2015 study in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Yerba mate is considered a substitute for coffee—without the bitterness—so try it in place of your morning Joe tomorrow. (Consider these fat-releasing habits to help you slim down.)
LoseWeightByEating.com is committed to providing information on natural and alternative health, but is not written by health care professionals. All material provided at LoseWeightByEating.com is for informational purposes only, and is not to be taken as medical advice or recommendation. Any health concern or condition should be addressed by a doctor or other appropriate health care professional. The information and opinions found on this website are written based on the best data available at the time of writing, and are believed to be accurate according to the best discernment of the authors. Those who do not seek council from the appropriate health care authority assume the liability of any injury which may occur. Additionally, the opinions expressed at LoseWeightByEating.com do not represent the views of each and every author or contributor to LoseWeightByEating.com. The publisher of this site is not responsible for any errors or omissions in any content herein.
×