This South American tea comes from the yerba mate plant. Its leaves and twigs are dried, usually over a fire, and steeped in hot water to make an herbal tea. This caffeine-containing tea, often called mate, may help promote weight loss. Some consider it an ideal substitute for coffee, minus the bitterness. The Mayo Clinic advises, however, to enjoy this tea in moderation. Some studies have found that people who drink large amounts of mate over prolonged periods may be at increased risk for certain types of cancer such as cancer of the mouth, lungs and esophagus (smoking in combination with drinking mate increases the cancer risk).
A cup of this herbal brew each day isn't likely to get you back into your skinny jeans. But some research suggests tea may help you lose a very small amount of weight when you pair it with a sensible diet and exercise. And consider this: If you swap out your morning mocha latte for a cup of tea with lemon, you'll trim almost 300 calories from your daily total.
I first learned about the weight-loss power of tea when my mother fell victim to diabetes. A former nurse back in Korea, she urged me to look into Eastern remedies when it became clear that Western science couldn’t help her. And time and again, as I pored through the studies, the same answer kept popping up: tea. What I learned in my research, and collected in my new book, The 7-Day Flat Belly Tea Cleanse, in which test panelists lost up to 10 pounds in just one week, was that certain teas not only melt fat by boosting metabolism, but can actually prevent our bodies from forming new fat cells.
High in good bacteria, the benefits of yoghurt on gastrointestinal health have been said to provide health benefits for certain gastrointestinal conditions, including lactose intolerance, constipation, IBS, colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, and allergies. Look for the nutrition label and make sure no added sugar is used. Opt for Greek yoghurt varieties and use your own frozen berries and cinnamon to sweeten.
People have been drinking teas for thousands of years, and it’s no wonder why: when something is as tasty and beneficial for your health as tea, the only question is how it could fall out of favor — while it’s the second most popular drink in the world after water, Americans tend to prefer coffee, although the U.S. has been picking up in its consumption lately. Perhaps an increase in tea drinking will help reduce obesity rates — it’s not beyond the infusion’s power.
Sidney is a two-time James Beard Award-winning food and nutrition writer, editor and mom based out of Birmingham, Alabama. A registered dietitian with a passion for research and being proactive about health, she loves to eat, write, run and create simple, tasty meals with whole-food-based approach. Find out more from her website, Instagram or Twitter.
While booze shouldn’t be part of your daily weight loss diet, downing a drink every now and again won’t throw you far off track — so long as you order smart. Every Mad Men fan knows that Don Draper favors the Old Fashioned. And just so long as you don’t sip them to his level of excess, the 119-calorie low-sugar drink can keep you on the track toward your better body goal. Not a fan of whiskey? Check out these other delicious, low-calorie cocktails.
This tea is a weight-loss ninja. The stem, fruit and root bark of the barberry shrub contains berberine–a powerful, naturally occurring, fat-frying chemical. A study conducted by Chinese researchers revealed that berberine can prevent weight gain and the development of insulin resistance in rats consuming a high-fat diet. Previous studies have also found that consuming the plant can boost energy expenditure and help decrease the number of receptors on the surface of fat cells, making them less apt to absorb incoming sources of flubber. For more weight loss foods, check out these 7 Best Foods for Rapid Weight Loss.

"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
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