Other intermittent fasting diets take a different approach. The 5:2 method, for example, requires you to eat as you normally would for five days a week, but on two nonconsecutive days, you eat just one meal a day. Wright says she spent five months conditioning her body to the 16:8 method. At that point, she says, she switched to the 20:4 method. According to this method, you fast for 20 hours and have a 4-hour eating window.
When you’re in the mood for a spicy kick, make ginger your go-to weight-loss tea. Eating the zesty rhizome on its own has been found to reduce inflammation and better your blood pressure. In a small study in the journal Metabolism, subjects who drank a ginger beverage with breakfast reported lower hunger and greater satiety. (Always hungry? Here are 8 reasons you can’t stop eating.)
When obese people structured their schedule so that they fasted for 16 hours a day, but were free to eat whatever they wanted in the other eight hours — known as the 16:8 diet, or time-restricted feeding — they modestly lost weight and lowered their blood pressure after 12 weeks on the regimen, a new early study published in the journal Nutrition and Healthy Aging found.
There are some downsides, however. As she explains, "By day two you may as well have all your calls forwarded to the toilet because you will be spending a lot of time in the bathroom. The first time I did the cleanse, I was out with my kids at the mall when all of a sudden I needed a bathroom, stat! It was a nightmare, trying to pack everyone up and find the restroom. I learned the mall is not the place you want to be when your body starts trying to eliminate toxins."
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