I am 60 and 80lbs over what I want to weigh. (I weigh 320 @ 6’4″ and was into body building in my 30’s. Back then, I had just under 200lbs of lean muscle and bone.) I also now have a computer running my heart (CRT-D) and have type 2 with an A1C hovering around 6.3-7.0. The CRT-D has a ‘cap’ on my BPM of 140, so as soon as I get over 120bpm, it starts shutting me down ….in a hurry! (Prior to getting it, I had to crawl to cross the living room. Now I’m back in my home wood shop creating my own line of furniture to fill my home, and I walk 90% of WallyWorld and Costco twice a week, …not fast, but I get there.) I also lost a kidney to cancer back in ’87, but the other one has taken over nicely. I have a salt limitation as well, consuming – or fight to consume – less than 600mg/meal, though most are around 800. Adding all of those up, weight loss – especially to have a good intense workout – is impossible.

Enthusiasm for intermittent fasting was fuelled by data from animal studies that suggested fasting could help reduce the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer. However, few studies have actually examined the effects of intermittent fasting on humans for longer than six months. Carrying out long-term studies that control diet is difficult because it’s hard to get people to stick to them, and results can be affected by outside factors.
In a small skillet heat the remaining ½ teaspoon olive oil on medium low. Whisk the egg whites and eggs together with a tablespoon of water until light and airy and add to the small skillet. Let cook slowly undisturbed until ½ of the eggs have set. Use a spatula to gently lift one side of the omelet so that the runny eggs can pool below, then lay back down the cooked eggs and top the entire top of the omelet with cheese.
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