Feasting eight hours and then fasting the following 16 hours? Or is it even better to fast two whole days a week and then enjoy eating without regrets for the rest of the week? Intermittent fasting, also known as 16:8 diet or 5:2 diet, is trendy. Numerous popular self-help books on this topic promise weight loss without yo-yo effect, as well as sustained changes in metabolism and resulting health benefits. The German Nutrition Society (DGE), on the other hand, warns that intermittent fasting is not suitable for long-term weight regulation. In addition, according to DGE, there is not enough scientific evidence on the long-term effects of this dieting method.
Before a workout, turbocharge the fat-blasting effects by sipping a cup of green tea. In a recent 12-week study, participants who combined a daily habit of 4-5 cups of green tea each day with a 25-minute sweat session lost an average of two more pounds than the non tea-drinking exercisers. Thank the compounds in green tea called catechins, flat belly crusaders that blast adipose tissue by triggering the release of fat from fat cells (particularly in the belly), and then speeding up the liver’s capacity for turning that fat into energy.
The best way to drink tea is to sip it slowly, not chug it all at once. Try to spend at least 10-20 minutes enjoying your cup of tea and wait awhile before making another cup. This will ensure your body can gradually absorb all the polyphenols (antioxidants) instead of overloading your body all at once. Chugging a cup of tea too quickly can actually cause nausea, stomach sensitivity or caffeine overdose.
Suprisingly, though, fasting may be a good idea. A recent review by Stephen Anton and colleagues, in the journal Obesity, found that intermittent fasting may come with a variety of health benefits, including reducing inflammation, improving the ratio of lean tissue to fat, improving cognitive function, preventing type 2 diabetes, and possibly even prolonging life span.
Feelings over hunger may also become more tolerable over time. Studies of alternate-day fasting have shown that people rate their hunger at 8 on a scale of 1 to 10 for their first few fast days, but after two weeks, that number drops to 3. Mattson puts the window at three to four weeks, after which, he says, "you're not hungry on fasting days." (Try clean eating to shed stubborn pounds. This plan gives you 150 delicious recipes you'll love!)
Here is the most complete detox agent in the world; however, there is one caveat. This one is not necessarily water. Unlike all of the other entries on this list, the last slot is occupied by a bona fide juice. Part of the reason for this listing is the fact that no one can abide by water 100% of the time. If a relapse is going to occur, it better at least be done right. When a fuller drink is needed, connoisseurs always have this magnificent potion on hand. Its smooth texture stems from nectarines, pears, honeydew and carrots. Beneficial agents include carrots, celery, lemon and ginger.
Yes, you can detox and lose fat at the same time. Studies show several common detox ingredients also contribute to weight loss, directly or indirectly. It makes sense that you lose weight during the cleansing process. After all, you’re ridding your body of old toxins and waste that contribute to the added pounds on the scale. We’ll identify the best cleanse for weight loss. While purifying your body should be the primary goal, don’t be surprised if you drop a few pounds while at it.

"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.

×