There’s a right and wrong way to brew green tea. When brewing green tea, take a little extra care, as boiling water is bad for the precious catechins (tea’s healthy chemicals). Do bring your water to a boil, but let it rest for about ten minutes. Then, pour the water over the tea and brew for about one minute before serving. Of course, the brew time can be made shorter or longer, depending on your taste.
When all of the ingredients merge in fresh water, the liquid transforms into a brightly iridescent purple state. The glow may be intimidating, but gals that are in the know trust this drink beyond all others. Spicy sage is the secret ingredient that lulls the tummy into complacency. It is a light undertone on the palate, and it divinely quenches any thirst or hunger. Blackberries promote digestive functions by stimulating acidic reactions. They are laced with vitamin C and A. This helps flush all poisons from a girls body immediately.
Many of today’s trending craft beers have as much as 200–250 calories per pint, and that’s just for one. Wine has around 120 calories per 5-ounce pour, if you can limit it to just a glass. Cocktails mixed with sodas, simple syrups and tonic waters add up quickly, too — and come in much smaller portions that “vanish” rapidly. Limiting alcoholic beverages is one of the first steps you can take for successful weight loss.
Fasting has been growing in popularity in recent years. One of the latest fads is intermittent fasting, in which you fast at regular intervals and then eat all you want in between. There's the 5-2 fast, where you eat for 5 days and fast for 2, every week. Or there's alternate-day fasting, where you eat one day and fast the next, for as long as you can. Or you can fast every day for 16 hours and get all your eating done in the other 8.
This South American tea comes from the yerba mate plant. Its leaves and twigs are dried, usually over a fire, and steeped in hot water to make an herbal tea. This caffeine-containing tea, often called mate, may help promote weight loss. Some consider it an ideal substitute for coffee, minus the bitterness. The Mayo Clinic advises, however, to enjoy this tea in moderation. Some studies have found that people who drink large amounts of mate over prolonged periods may be at increased risk for certain types of cancer such as cancer of the mouth, lungs and esophagus (smoking in combination with drinking mate increases the cancer risk).
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
×