The majority of research on tea and weight loss has been conducted on green tea, and it’s believed that its combination of caffeine and polyphenols may have a small impact on metabolism, Ansel says. However, Cording points out that the effect is basically negligible. “Drinking green tea for a short period of time to lose weight will likely not result in noticeable weight loss,” she says. An often-cited 2009 meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Obesity found that green tea had a “small positive effect” on weight loss and weight maintenance, but researchers said their conclusions “should be treated with caution” since they weren’t able to prove that green tea actually caused the weight loss—just that there was a link. However, not all studies have been able to prove a link, leading many researcher to say green tea’s impact on weight loss is “inconclusive.”
With this new-found popularity, the number and type of cleanse diets has soared, from food-based "liver detoxes" to liquid-only fasts for several weeks and everything in between. While the extreme cleanses often get a bad rap—Beyonce confessed that drinking the maple syrup-lemon-cayenne pepper concoction made her "cranky"—many women swear by cleanse diets to lose weight, increase energy, and even help clear up acne.
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