If you do Zumba or CrossFit or power yoga or are in the midst of training for a marathon or the Miss Olympia contest, by all means continue. But whether you’re a couch surfer or an actual surfer, you’ll jump-start your weight loss if you add in a 10- minute walk outdoors. This easy a.m. ritual works on two levels. First, a recent study found that exposure to UV rays, even on a cloudy day, between the hours of 8 am and noon reduces your risk of weight gain. Researchers speculate that the morning light synchronizes your metabolism and undercuts your fat genes. And burning calories before you eat means you’re exercising in a fasted state. According to some studies, exercising in a fasted state can burn almost 20 percent more fat compared to exercising with fuel in the tank.
If you want a drink that mimics the fancy beverages served in health spas, try this homemade detox water. This is one of the best-rounded brews ever devised by human minds. The lemon leads to a cleaned out digestive system, and cucumbers keep your figure slim by eliminating unnecessary water storage. Strawberries combine with the other fruits to provide the most prominent edge of sweetness, which is accompanied by the brisk coolness of mint. This digestive aid merges efforts with the basil to create a stable stomach for any lass. Get ready to feel like you just ordered room service!
Tea is an ancient beverage that helps boost weight loss and your overall health (1), (2). And you know that green tea, from the plant Camellia sinensis, is one of the most popular and trusted weight loss beverages (3). But scientists have found anti-obesity properties in numerous other herbs, roots, and flowers that you can consume as tea (4). Sure, green tea is amazing for weight loss, and it tops our list. But if green tea is giving you the blues, you can give these other teas a try. This article lists 12 best teas for weight loss – and everything else you need to know to boost it. Swipe up!
However, in places like Japan, the UK, and large swaths of Southeast Asia, tea leaves are as diverse and nuanced as wine grapes. Not only does the flavor profile change dramatically between one tea variety and the next, but so do the health benefits. Not only can certain brews fight off various diseases, select teas have also been shown to rev the metabolism, quell hunger, slash waist-widening stress and shrink fat cells. When Taiwanese researchers studied more than 1,100 people over a 10-year period, they determined that those who drank tea had naearly 20 percent less body fat than those who drank none!
Drinking a combination of carbohydrates and protein after a hard workout can help restore your energy and aid in building lean, metabolism-boosting muscle, but it turns out that you don’t need a fancy recovery beverage to reap these benefits. After participating in a vigorous cycling session, cyclists who drank chocolate milk were able to ride 51 percent longer in a subsequent workout than those who drank a standard recovery beverage, a 2009 article in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism found. Plus, chocolate milk is cheaper (and tastier) than anything you’ll find in a sports nutrition store.
So even if tea doesn't help you lose weight, there are plenty of other reasons to drink up. Drinking black tea, which is high in flavonoids, was tied to improved cardiovascular function in a small study in the Journal of Hypertension. Both black and green tea were shown to decrease risk of stroke and coronary heart disease in another study from Food & Function. And a 13-year study of nearly 40,000 people in the Netherlands found that those who drank tea frequently had a lower risk of heart disease-related death compared to people who didn't drink tea. While the four varieties of true teas tend to provide highest concentrations of antioxidants, herbal teas have also been linked to better heart health (hibiscus tea in particular) and other benefits.
That said, there are some amazing teas out there. Teas that taste delicious — preventing you from getting bored and picking up a sugar- and chemical-packed soda — and that can genuinely assist you in your healthy dieting goals. Some teas have "many beneficial compounds that can battle and actually block the absorption of fat," Dr. Verma says.[slideshow:
After a fast, the greatest danger lies in eating too much and too frequently. If you rush into eating solid foods, overloading your digestive organs with large amounts of food, you may provoke acute attacks of indigestion and experience physical problems such as diarrhea, sickness and fainting. Moreover, you risk serious medical disturbances. Before embarking on a fast, speak to your doctor. Also, if you do ignore all the warnings and pursue overeating after breaking your fast, you will pile on weight (fat, not fluid).

Individuals use intermittent fasting to lose weight fast. In studies done by the NIH, there was reported weight loss with over 84% of participants — no matter which method of fasting they chose (alternate day fasting, the 8/16 method, or another approach)[*]. Science has shown intermittent fasting to be an efficient weight loss tool, sometimes more than simply cutting calories. In one study, intermittent fasting was shown to be as effective as continuous calorie restriction in fighting obesity[*].
Get this: Green tea literally blasts away flab! Researchers attribute the fat-burning properties of green tea to catechins, specifically EGCG — the name of a group of antioxidative compounds that blast adipose tissue by revving the metabolism, increasing the release of fat from fat cells (particularly in the belly), and then speeding up the liver’s fat burning capacity. It gets better: Research suggests that combining regular green-tea drinking with exercise may maximize the weight loss benefits. In one study, participants who combined a daily habit of 4-5 cups of green tea with a 25-minute workout lost 2 more pounds than the non-tea-drinking exercisers. To reap even more flat-belly benefits from your fitness routine, be sure you’re incorporating these Best Weight Loss Exercises in the World.
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
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