That all depends on what you put in your detox water. A very common recipe is Lemon Cucumber with a Mint twist. Sounds delicious? It is! But it’s also great for your body. The Lemon helps to boost your immune system and rids your body of harmful toxins. The cucumber is a great anti-inflammatory and it’s also amazing for staying hydrated. The mint…? Well, mostly it’s there to help sweeten your detox water, but it also helps your body with digestion.
Because water is an appetite suppressant, drinking it before meals can make you feel fuller, therefore reducing the amount of food you eat. Health resource website WebMD states that drinking water before meals results in an average reduction in intake of 75 calories per meal. Drinking water before just one meal per day would cause you to ingest 27,000 fewer calories per year. Do the math: You'd lose about eight pounds per year just from drinking water! Now imagine if you drank it before each meal. Our Gaiam Stainless Steel Water Bottle is a great way to make sure you are getting the right amount of water before a meal.

Intermittent fasting — the most popular form of fasting today — consists of eating within a specific window of time in the day, and not eating for the remaining hours of the day. For example, one popular version of intermittent fasting is the 16/8 method. This entails a nonfasting window of eight hours (such as 11am to 7pm) followed by a fasting period.


Mason, A. E., Epel, E. S., Aschbacher, K., Lustig, R. H., Acree, M., Kristeller, J., … Daubenmier, J. (2016, May 1). Reduced reward-driven eating accounts for the impact of a mindfulness-based diet and exercise intervention on weight loss: Data from the SHINE randomized controlled trial. Appetite , 100, 86–93. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4799744/
In a recent Eat This, Not That! taste test, we rounded up all of the light beers we could find that ranked among the top 20 most purchased beers in America. we managed to track down all but Busch Light and Michelob Ultra and filled in the rest of the list with light beers we felt would be missed if they weren’t included. You know, the household names that don’t have the really big advertising bucks behind them. We ended up with a solid list of 13 brews. Of the 13, Sam Adams Light ranked numero uno. It was lauded for its discernable nutty flavor and relatively full body. One tester even noted that it “tasted like something I might find in a nice beer garden!” To find out which other tasty beers topped our list, check out the full report on the Best Light Beers in America.
Everyone’s water needs are different, but the Mayo Clinic recommends that most people aim to drink eight eight-ounce glasses of fluid a day. “That’s a good jumping off point, but a lot of people do better with more,” Cording says. That doesn’t mean you should guzzle gallons of water a day, but having an extra glass or two could make a big difference.
Individuals use intermittent fasting to lose weight fast. In studies done by the NIH, there was reported weight loss with over 84% of participants — no matter which method of fasting they chose (alternate day fasting, the 8/16 method, or another approach)[*]. Science has shown intermittent fasting to be an efficient weight loss tool, sometimes more than simply cutting calories. In one study, intermittent fasting was shown to be as effective as continuous calorie restriction in fighting obesity[*].
The morning java boost is a necessity for many of us, but there’s proof that the jolt may spur a better workout (translation: burn more calories). A 2015 study in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness found that participants could do almost 20% more leg presses and 12% more bench presses when they drank 2–3 cups of coffee before their workout. A similar 2011 study found an (albeit small) increase in energy expenditure both before and after exercise in the group that drank coffee before exercise.

Why try a plan with a high dropout rate and hours of hunger? Beyond the health benefits, some people actually like it—and find it the easiest way to control their weight. Mark Mattson, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at the National Institute on Aging, has studied intermittent fasting since the 1990s and himself been on a plan for years. "Once you get used to it, it's not a big deal," he says. "You adapt." Other fans? Reportedly, trendsters from Beyonce to Silicon Valley techies; and Jimmy Kimmel has said he lost 25 pounds fasting too. So... should you experiment?


The morning java boost is a necessity for many of us, but there’s proof that the jolt may spur a better workout (translation: burn more calories). A 2015 study in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness found that participants could do almost 20% more leg presses and 12% more bench presses when they drank 2–3 cups of coffee before their workout. A similar 2011 study found an (albeit small) increase in energy expenditure both before and after exercise in the group that drank coffee before exercise.

You’ve probably heard it more than once: drinking more water will help you lose more weight. But does water really help weight loss? The short answer is yes. Drinking water helps boost your metabolism, cleanse your body of waste, and acts as an appetite suppressant. Also, drinking more water helps your body stop retaining water, leading you to drop those extra pounds of water weight. What can you do to make sure you’re drinking the recommended eight to ten eight-ounce glasses per day to keep yourself hydrated and encourage weight loss?
I ended up following a very rigorous intermittent fasting program for a little over two months (April 6 through June 10), in which I not only fasted every other day, but, aside from that first non-fasting day, tried to be careful about my eating on non-fasting days in the way I had become used to being (and that had resulted in weight loss for the first few months of 2013). And I also kept up my exercise, doing a solid hour of aerobic exercise (usually on an elliptical machine, or, about once per week, running), working very hard for that hour, about 6 times per week. The results are shown in this chart:
The majority of research on tea and weight loss has been conducted on green tea, and it’s believed that its combination of caffeine and polyphenols may have a small impact on metabolism, Ansel says. However, Cording points out that the effect is basically negligible. “Drinking green tea for a short period of time to lose weight will likely not result in noticeable weight loss,” she says. An often-cited 2009 meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Obesity found that green tea had a “small positive effect” on weight loss and weight maintenance, but researchers said their conclusions “should be treated with caution” since they weren’t able to prove that green tea actually caused the weight loss—just that there was a link. However, not all studies have been able to prove a link, leading many researcher to say green tea’s impact on weight loss is “inconclusive.”
With this new-found popularity, the number and type of cleanse diets has soared, from food-based "liver detoxes" to liquid-only fasts for several weeks and everything in between. While the extreme cleanses often get a bad rap—Beyonce confessed that drinking the maple syrup-lemon-cayenne pepper concoction made her "cranky"—many women swear by cleanse diets to lose weight, increase energy, and even help clear up acne.
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