Last week, I did a 16 hour fast by skipping breakfast. I found the mental stimulation to be quite palpable, and the hunger to be tolerable.  Over this weekend, I did a 38 hour fast, and although there were periods of hunger which I controlled with coconut oil and electrolyte solutions, it was also not as difficult as I had predicted. Luckily, due to loads of research coming out regarding its health benefits, it’s not as socially awkward as it maybe once was. I actually went to a barbeque and was totally fine socializing there with friends. I plan to incorporate some form of fasting into my weekly routines going forward.
“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.

Rather than raising hell in the locker room with your load shaker bottle, throw one of these in your gym bag for post-pump recovery. Electrolyte-rich coconut water rehydrates you while the nutrients in milk proteins replenish glycogen stores and help muscles recover. After a particular strenuous workout, pair it with a piece of fruit to boost health carbs available for your body’s recovery.
This red, naturally sweet tea made from the leaves of the Rooibos bush is a powerful fat-melter. According to South African researchers, polyphenols and flavonoids found in the plant inhibit adipogenesis—the formation of new fat cells–by as much as 22 percent. The chemicals also help rev fat mebaolism, so it might be smart to sip on if there's some stubborn weight clinging to your middle.
I felt energized and clear-headed, I had absolutely no bloating, I slept well, and I had less cravings for sugar and other crappy food. Since I was spending less time prepping, cooking, and cleaning up after meals, I had more time to do other things — I was more productive. It sounds insane, but I found I was actually looking forward to my fasting days because I felt so good, especially on Mondays, as a way to reset after a deliciously indulgent weekend.
Sweetened with a touch of stevia, this is a new breed of protein shake, made primarily of hydrating coconut water. Grass-fed milk protein supplies more protein than three eggs–for a fraction of the morning prep time. If you need your fuel with caffeine-derived focus, they offer a coffee flavor that uses plenty of joe–in fact, it’s the second ingredient.
Today, most commercial detox diets tout an unhealthy formula of minimal calories and nutrients along with some key—usually foul-tasting—ingredient that has supposed fat-melting power, like cayenne pepper or vinegar. But no science backs the idea that following a specific diet for a week or eating only one food will get rid of "toxins." Your body has the power to do that all on its own: That's why you have a liver, kidneys, and a digestive system.

Today, I had (this time) a legit excuse to skip the gym = sleep in! I bounded into work on a solid 8 hours of sleep. I continue sipping on the colourful drinks (which take me a surprisingly long time to finish) and after each juice I go through a sugar high for about 30mins where I am annoyingly happy, motivated and full of energy before crumbling into the pits of headaches, tiredness and despair. Unfortunately, the fun has already worn off, I know which drinks I like and look forward too and which ones I am going to suffer through.

Mason, A. E., Epel, E. S., Aschbacher, K., Lustig, R. H., Acree, M., Kristeller, J., … Daubenmier, J. (2016, May 1). Reduced reward-driven eating accounts for the impact of a mindfulness-based diet and exercise intervention on weight loss: Data from the SHINE randomized controlled trial. Appetite , 100, 86–93. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4799744/


I was going to the gym, mostly to play basketball with my son, or, if he wasn’t with me, just to “shoot around.” My wife would also go, and used her time wisely, mainly using one of the elliptical machines. I would come up from the basketball court to the weight/exercise machine room and lift weights while I waited for her to finish. At some point, I started joining her on a nearby elliptical machine, first for just about 10 minutes or so, and then slowly increasing until I was doing about 36 minutes (which was about how long it took me to do 4 miles on the settings I was using). Being one to keep track of such things, I started bringing a pocket calendar, and recording what I did. The elliptical machine wanted to know my weight, so it could calculate the calories I burned, so I would step on the scale they had there, and enter my weight, and then I recorded my weight along with my settings, time, distance, and calories, on my calendar. In that way, I stumbled onto the important practice of keeping fairly regular track of my weight.
Jeni S., a 31-year-old mom of two and group fitness instructor, first discovered cleanse diets after talking with a fellow fitness instructors. "I was complaining to her about my post-holiday bloat and she recommended I try a cleanse to 'flush' it all out and sort of reset everything." On her friend's recommendation, Jeni started with the Shakeology Jumpstart Cleanse—"a nutrient rich, calorie restrictive cleanse designed to help rid your body of undigested food and other toxins." She adds, "The goal is to get as many nutrients with as few calories as possible."
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