Because you'll eat often—at least every four hours—and drink as much water and decaffeinated tea as you want, you'll beat bloat while keeping your blood sugar steady and your energy high. This means you'll be able to cut back without feeling cranky, exhausted, or hungry. And—we pinky swear—you won't have to gulp down a single glass of cayenne-spiked liquid.
You already know the top offenders, right? The milkshakes, margaritas, unnecessary sports drinks, and super-sized Cokes. If you’re trying to lose weight, it’s pretty obvious that you’ve got to cross these off your list of go-to beverages. But that’s not all that’s screwing over your plans to get in shape. Even some seemingly-innocent drinks can set you back. “You can literally guzzle down hundreds of calories without even realizing it,” says Karen Ansel, R.D.N., author of Healing Superfoods for Anti-Aging: Stay Younger, Live Longer. That’s because our brains don’t register feelings of fullness from liquids the same way they do from solids, she says.

"Right now, I'm on the third day of my 10-day Sunfare Optimal Cleanse! I'm SO excited to do this, you guys, but I definitely need to mentally prepare, lol. I have the Met Gala coming up and I've worked so hard working out, but I started eating a lot of sweets and I wanted to just change my food patterns to eat healthier and cut sugar out of my life as much as I can. We always have sweets around and it's really hard when there are temptations everywhere."


Each tea has its own special benefit, but just the act of drinking tea can be good for you, too: when you’re on a diet, you want to ensure that you definitely get those eight cups of water per day. Caffeine-free teas —or more properly teasans (infusions made from plants other than camellia sinensis), can create a feeling of fullness and help you keep your diet on track. Don’t make your healthy drink harmful, though. "To further promote weight loss, try to avoid using heavy creamers or whole milk and refined sugars," Dr. Verma explains. What to know what teas are best for weight loss? Read on to find out.

"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
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