Made from pulverized green tea leaves, you stir matcha into hot water. Therefore, you consume the whole tea leaf. For that reason, you get a bigger dose of ECGC. One study from the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs compared the two and found that drinking matcha delivered 137 times the metabolism-revving ECGC compared to traditional green tea. One tip: if you find matcha to be too bitter on its own, foam it into milk and stir with honey for a delicious matcha latte. (If you need some more convincing, here’s some more information on how incredible matcha is as a weight-loss tea.)
Lemon water detox methods have reached a zenith with this thirst-quenching diet recipe. For those that love sugary drinks, this tasty blend can permanently replace sodas and fruit juices. The mint is uniquely calming for all possible tummy woes; simultaneously, the lemons provide the maximum amount of internal cleansing. This vibrant potion will even appeal to those who don’t typically consume water on its own. The tingling refreshment is hard to surpass on any scale. Huge quantities of advantageous electrolytes are naturally embedded in the citrus fluids, and the chilly mint undertones in this recipe will cool off the entire beverage.
Feasting eight hours and then fasting the following 16 hours? Or is it even better to fast two whole days a week and then enjoy eating without regrets for the rest of the week? Intermittent fasting, also known as 16:8 diet or 5:2 diet, is trendy. Numerous popular self-help books on this topic promise weight loss without yo-yo effect, as well as sustained changes in metabolism and resulting health benefits. The German Nutrition Society (DGE), on the other hand, warns that intermittent fasting is not suitable for long-term weight regulation. In addition, according to DGE, there is not enough scientific evidence on the long-term effects of this dieting method.
OK, we’re totally cheating here. Hint Water isn’t carbonated, cola-flavored or sold in 64-ounce Big Gulps. But these new flavored bottled waters do have 60 milligrams of caffeine, derived from coffee beans. That’s more than you’ll find in Diet Dr. Pepper (41 mg), Diet Coke (47 mg) or even Mountain Dew (54 mg). So you get all of the pop, with none of the calories—and each flavor is sweetened not with aspartame, but with fruit juice or spice. Try the Lemon Cayenne Hint Kick (and don’t overdo it, since caffeine can dehydrate you), and you’ll never go back to Diet Coke again.

Whether a regimen calls for two fasting days a week or eating your meals in a smaller "window" of time in the day, all plans share a near-freedom from calorie counting, a big plus for weary food diarists. Once you have planned your fasting-period menu—say, a 500-calorie day of chicken and veggies—you're set. And in your nonfasting periods, you eat normal, healthy meals (even that steak!) without worrying about every bite.
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
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