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Then one evening in early April, I was doing some light work on my computer at home (replying to emails) with the TV on in the background, when a show about weight loss came on PBS. It was “Eat, Fast, and Live Longer,” produced by BBC, in which the British journalist and physician Michael Mosley checks recent research on, and also tries himself, various ways of trying to control weight and remain healthy. If you want, you can watch the show here:
There are many ups and downs (thankfully, more downs than ups, all told), but from my point of view, other than at point A, where I started trying to lose weight, and point D, where I started intermittent fasting, the changes in direction are not due to changes in my effort: there’s been no giving up or even easing up. From point A to point D, I kept up my efforts, the only changes being in little increases in them (increasing exercise, decreasing eating). From A to C, I was mostly losing weight at a pretty good clip — except for a very frustrating period at B. Then at C, what I was doing no longer worked, my weight shot up a bit, and then I wrestled it up and down. Then at D, I started intermittent fasting, and that worked very well — for a while. A year ago, I was thinking I could just ride intermittent fasting to my goal (below 190 lbs.), and then could ease up to maybe 2 fasting days per week to keep my weight where I wanted it. But then, right around my goal, intermittent fasting stopped working, at least in lowering my weight further: it seemed needed just to keep it from shooting back up further than it did. I’ve basically had to keep fasting 3 days per week just to maintain, and still, the last couple of months it shot up in an alarming way, despite everything. The last week or so, there are signs that it may be turning around to head down again. So I do have some hope that maybe I’ll be breaking through a floor of sorts, my weight will go back down, get below 190, and allow me to perhaps go down to 2 fast days per week. But that’s just a hope. There’s also cause for concern: this could also just be a pause before it starts going up again.
A specific type of continuous (every day) fasting diet is called a protein sparing modified fast or a very low energy diet. These limit you to 1,800 to 2,500 kilojoules a day, every day. They use products called formulated meal replacements, in the form of milkshakes or snack bars to replace most meals and snacks. These are supplemented with vitamins and minerals to meet the body’s nutrient needs.
This red, naturally sweet tea made from the leaves of the Rooibos bush is a powerful fat-melter. According to South African researchers, polyphenols and flavonoids found in the plant inhibit adipogenesis—the formation of new fat cells–by as much as 22 percent. The chemicals also help rev fat mebaolism, so it might be smart to sip on if there's some stubborn weight clinging to your middle.

Juice can have as many calories as soda, but it has more nutrients. This presents a dilemma: You want the vitamins and antioxidants without all the extra sugar. Look for 100% fruit juice. Steer clear of juice drinks that have added sweeteners. Check the nutrition label for the percentage of real juice. You can also slash calories by drinking water with a tiny bit of juice added.
White tea is dried naturally, often in sunlight, making it the least processed and richest source of antioxidants among teas (as much as three times as many polyphenols as green tea!). A study published in the journal Nutrition and Metabolism showed that white tea can simultaneously boost lipolysis (the breakdown of fat) and block adipogenesis (the formation of fat cells) due to high levels of ingredients thought to be active on human fat cells. And keep your waistline toned and tight—in record time—with these essential 7 Best Foods for Rapid Weight Loss.
Wheatgrass has a high concentration of iron, magnesium, calcium, amino acids, vitamins C, A and E, B12, B6 and chlorophyll. These vitamins and minerals provide many therapeutic benefits. Consuming wheatgrass can rid the digestive system of harmful bacteria and cleanse the body of toxins. It also cleanses the colon and can help in the treatment of joint pain, ulcerative colitis, skin infections and can even prevent diabetes. No wonder it is regarded as a superfood!
Certain fasts such as Ramadan and Yom Kippur require you to go without water throughout the fast. Though this does not cause any lasting harm, you are most likely to feel dehydrated towards the end of the fast. Thus, it is important to keep yourself hydrated after the fast. If you are not fasting for religious reasons, make it a point to drink plenty of water during your fast.
With every glass, this spa water is sure to refresh and rehydrate you. All it takes is one cinnamon stick and a red apple. This is all it takes to put together one of the finest detox water recipes known to women. Children especially adore these kinds of brews. As such, the weight-loss powers extend to all ages. The tastiness does not hurt this drinks positive reputation either. It is uniquely suited for the colder seasons, and it garners plenty of holiday cheer. Both of the essential components within this beverage automatically act as appetite suppressants, so snacking ceases to exist.
And Ian K. Smith, M.D. agrees. Dr. Ian is a Harvard graduate, founder of the SHRED Lifestyle, and the author several best-selling diet books. He explains that the liver, kidney, lungs, skin, and gastrointestinal system remove toxins that accumulate in the body. But following a detox diet full of natural foods can enhance the body's ability to cleanse. He adds, however, that dieters should make no assumptions about health when choosing a detox diet. "Detoxes have gotten very trendy, and many of them are unhealthy and quite dangerous."
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