Harvie, M. N., Pegington, M., Mattson, M. P., Frystyk, J., Dillon, B., Evans, G., … Howell, A. (2011, May). The effects of intermittent or continuous energy restriction on weight loss and metabolic disease risk markers: A randomized trial in young overweight women. International Journal of Obesity (London), 35(5), 714–727. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3017674/
Since the beginning of recovery nutrition, the first two or three days (depending on the period of fasting) weight reduction observed further up to 1 kg per day. Then comes a gradual increase in weight, but even after 10 days of recovery, the weight is less than the original. Rapid weight gain in the first week of fasting often indicative of excessive accumulation of water in the organism. Usually it is associated with the use of salt or salt-containing products, as well as the shortage of potassium in the organism. In this case, enough for a few days to take medications potassium (Asparcam or Panangin on one tablet 2-3 times a day) and delete products containing sodium chloride. After 7-10 days recovery stabilized and appetite is very important not to overeat and to move 3-4 meals a day. Basically the rules of restorative nutrition are the same as for normal recovery from fasting. It should reduce the amount of flour food, sweets, animal fats, increasing the amount of plant foods.
But there is a very important feature that limits the use of fasting to reduce excess weight. This is diet after fasting. The fact is that after fasting in the organism with the large reduction processes. The cells actively absorb nutrients, and if at that time did not limit itself to the food - your weight fairly quickly reach the previous standard, and is likely to exceed it for a few pounds. Therefore, if your aim is weight loss rather than a complete change of behavior that led you to obesity, fasting will not help you, rather it will increase your weight a few pounds from the original. So think hard before you can use fasting to reduce weight.
The problem with fasting is that due to severe calorie restriction, your basal metabolic rate (BMR) will decrease. It is thought that fasting can decrease the body’s metabolism by up to 22%. This means that your metabolism will slow down and theoretically, if you were to eat the same amount of calories you did before you started fasting, immediately on the stopping the fast, you would put on weight – not “water weight”, but fat. If this were to happen, you would end up with a higher body fat percentage than when you started.
Alcohol is particularly bad for your weight because it’s a toxin. Your body mobilizes to burn off the calories in alcohol as quickly as possible—ignoring any other calories that might have come along with it. So whether it’s wine and cheese or beer and wings, the body metabolizes the drink while shoving more of the accompanying food calories into fat cells.
Intermittent fasting (IF), a way of eating that involves going through periods of deliberately not eating (fasting) interspersed with periods of eating, has become a popular way for people to lose weight, regulate insulin levels, and lower blood sugar. As popular as intermittent fasting has become, there's no one-size-fits-all plan. There are several ways to do intermittent fasting; one of the most popular is the Leangains diet, or 16:8. This is where you fast for 16 hours a day and only eat in an eight-hour window, such as from noon until 8 p.m.
This eating style also appears to be difficult to stick to, she says. Thirty-eight percent of the alternate-day fasters dropped out, compared with 29 percent of the regular dieters. And about half of the alternate-day group ended up consuming more calories than planned on fasting days and fewer on feast days, so they essentially followed the same plan as the regular dieters.
The recommendations, results and safety of cleanses vary. Extreme cleanses, such as the Master Cleanse, which has you subsist on lemon juice, maple syrup and cayenne pepper for 10 days, can leave you weak and nauseous. You may lose weight in the short term, but are likely to gain back all the weight you lost shortly after returning to your old habits.
Jeni S., a 31-year-old mom of two and group fitness instructor, first discovered cleanse diets after talking with a fellow fitness instructors. "I was complaining to her about my post-holiday bloat and she recommended I try a cleanse to 'flush' it all out and sort of reset everything." On her friend's recommendation, Jeni started with the Shakeology Jumpstart Cleanse—"a nutrient rich, calorie restrictive cleanse designed to help rid your body of undigested food and other toxins." She adds, "The goal is to get as many nutrients with as few calories as possible."
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