Some teas—you may have seen them all over Instagram—also guarantee to detoxify you, which Ansel says is bogus. "Any tea that claims to detoxify your system is pure hype," she says. "Your body has its own built-in detoxication system that works 24/7—your liver, which dismantles toxins, and your kidneys, which flush out these waste products." There’s nothing in tea (or any other food product) that can detoxify you, she adds. In reality, these teas may just make you hit the bathroom more often, giving the illusion of detoxification. First of all, caffeine in general can make you poop. But some of these teas have extra laxative effects due to senna, a natural medicine that irritates the lining of your bowel, Ansel says. However, not all uses of senna are FDA-approved, and laxatives aren't a smart—or safe—method of losing weight.
If you ever need to treat a hangover, you’ve just stumbled on the right beverage for getting the job done. Coconut water is intensely hydrating, and it possesses an uncanny ability to mitigate come-downs from alcohol. It eases digestion and flushes harmful chemicals. A small navel orange pushes protective measures into the digestive systems, and blueberries banish all internal poisons while energizing the mind. With 4 sprigs of lush lavender, this drink is sultry and aromatic. This cunning combination can treat headaches and stomach aches alike. As an added bonus, the entire detox recipe is vegan and free of gluten.
Organically raised cows are not subject to the same hormones and antibiotics that conventional cows are; no antibiotics for them means no antibiotics for you. Grass fed cows have been shown to have higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids (good) and two to five times more CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) than their corn and grain fed counterparts. CLA contains a group of chemicals which provides a wide variety of health benefits, including immune and inflammatory system support, improved bone mass, improved blood sugar regulation, reduced body fat, reduced risk of heart attack, and maintenance of lean body mass. Go for 2%. Skim is mostly sugar.
“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.
Fasting has been growing in popularity in recent years. One of the latest fads is intermittent fasting, in which you fast at regular intervals and then eat all you want in between. There's the 5-2 fast, where you eat for 5 days and fast for 2, every week. Or there's alternate-day fasting, where you eat one day and fast the next, for as long as you can. Or you can fast every day for 16 hours and get all your eating done in the other 8.
Some foods, like fennel, increase levels of melatonin in your body, a hormone that helps you drift off at night—and per University of Granada research—may help buffer weight gain and lessen heart disease risk in healthy people. Truth: you might not find fennel tea to be palatable on its own, particularly if you’re not a licorice fan. You can buy mixed weight-loss teas like this one from Celestial Organics, which combines peppermint and fennel. (Besides this weight-loss tea, we bet you didn’t know these essential oils promote weight loss, too!)
If you like peppermint tea then try and rotate that with a green tea drink as both speed up digestion and thus help you burn more calories. The peppermint leaves can be used to make a light, refreshing tea, which can be drunk either hot or chilled. To prepare the tea, take a tablespoon of fresh or dried leaves and add them to boiling water and let it steep for four to five minutes. Strain and add honey, if needed.
On each day, you’ll enjoy—and we do mean enjoy—a blended smoothie designed to complement the natural weight loss and lean muscle gain you’ll see from the Zero Belly program. Studies show that high-protein, low-fat smoothies are highly effective at rushing nutrients to your muscles—which is why Dave recommends you have your drink immediately after exercise—and that blended fruit drinks, which include all the fiber, will actually keep you fuller longer than fruit juices. Click here to get the recipe for his favorite smoothie, the Strawberry Banana.
Clare Collins is affiliated with the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, the University of Newcastle, NSW. She is an NHMRC Senior Research fellow. She has received a range of research grants including NHMRC, ARC, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Meat and Livestock Australia, Diabetes Australia, the Heart Foundation. She has consulted to SHINE Australia, Novo Nordisk, Quality Bakers and the Sax Institute. She is a spokesperson for the Dietitians Association of Australia on some specific nutrition issues, including Australia's Healthy Weight Week.
For an ideal lemon water detox program, no weight-loss elixir can compare to this zesty potion. It is also remarkably simple to prepare. All it takes to bring this recipe to fruition is a 12-ounce glass of water, half a ginger root knob and a freshly squeezed lemon. The citrus promotes happy digestion, especially first thing in the morning. The ginger is also uniquely beneficial. With abundant quantities of special compounds known as shogaols, this bold additive quells nausea while guaranteeing intestinal wellness. Fresh ginger is also rich with gingerol, which is a magical detoxifying agent.

In what is perhaps the biggest buzzkill of all time, sex doesn’t quite count as cardio or burn a significant amount of calories: Women burn about 3.6 per minute. “It’s still a good idea,” Dr. Seltzer says, citing the activity’s other benefits, like increasing the output of the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, which naturally reduce food cravings.


Research suggests that weight loss is impacted by when we eat as much as by what we eat, which means intermittent fasting may help spur metabolism. There are several different methods for intermittent fasting, some of which are more restrictive than others. Wright recommends starting out with a less restrictive regime until your body is accustomed to it.
Consult your physician and follow all safety instructions before beginning any exercise program or using any supplement or meal replacement product, especially if you have any unique medical conditions or needs. The contents on our website are for informational purposes only, and are not intended to diagnose any medical condition, replace the advice of a healthcare professional, or provide any medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
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