Intermittent fasting has been shown to increase fat loss while maintaining lean muscle mass. In one four-week study, researchers concluded that a fasting diet resulted in greater weight loss — while maintaining muscle mass — than participants following a low-calorie diet. This happened even though the total calorie intake over the four weeks was similar in both groups[*].
In fact, because energy drinks are marketed as dietary supplements, companies can sneak past regulations required by the Food and Drug Administration. The result? A crash-and-burn cocktail of excess caffeine, bogus “herbal blends” and enough sugar to make a packet of Skittles look like the better option. According to one study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, a typical energy drink can have as much as a quarter cup of sugar, and upwards of 200 mg of caffeine—more than you’ll find in two very strong cups of coffee (a tall cup has about 71 mg)!
Having high-quality ingredients that are safe to consume is an absolute must. Some teas feature only organic or all natural ingredients. There are options specifically labeled non-GMO, gluten-free, and vegan. While this doesn’t necessarily mean they are better, it can lead to higher quality ingredients. The combination of ingredients also plays a role here. What does the blend consist of? What herbs and leaves are used determine how well the tea works. Does the tea contain Senna? This might be something some want to avoid, while others have no problem consuming the laxative.
While booze shouldn’t be part of your daily weight loss diet, downing a drink every now and again won’t throw you far off track — so long as you order smart. Every Mad Men fan knows that Don Draper favors the Old Fashioned. And just so long as you don’t sip them to his level of excess, the 119-calorie low-sugar drink can keep you on the track toward your better body goal. Not a fan of whiskey? Check out these other delicious, low-calorie cocktails.
Some teas—you may have seen them all over Instagram—also guarantee to detoxify you, which Ansel says is bogus. "Any tea that claims to detoxify your system is pure hype," she says. "Your body has its own built-in detoxication system that works 24/7—your liver, which dismantles toxins, and your kidneys, which flush out these waste products." There’s nothing in tea (or any other food product) that can detoxify you, she adds. In reality, these teas may just make you hit the bathroom more often, giving the illusion of detoxification. First of all, caffeine in general can make you poop. But some of these teas have extra laxative effects due to senna, a natural medicine that irritates the lining of your bowel, Ansel says. However, not all uses of senna are FDA-approved, and laxatives aren't a smart—or safe—method of losing weight.
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